The Lincoln Plawg - the blog with footnotes

Politics and law from a British perspective (hence Politics LAW BloG): ''People who like this sort of thing...'' as the Great Man said

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Friday, April 16, 2004
 

The final Bush flip-off for Blair?


Bush-Sharon strips away the Blair fig-leaf. Long the quid pro quo for acting the Charlie McCarthy to Bush's Edgar Bergen, the road-map over time just got dispensable.

Bush has never exactly revelled in diplomacy - he gives every appearance of being a sort of reverse Anthony Eden, who far preferred useless confabs [1] to taking hard decisions.

We recall the impatience with the second UN resolution and other inconveniences of the US-UK 'coalition' that famously caused Donald Rumsfeld to twinkle (those were the days!) that the US could manage Iraq on their own (March 12 2003). But, with war about to begin, that was overcome.

Blair has no further use for Bush - he's not planning for any more invasions taking place in the near future (I'm surmising!) - and buddying up to Sharon gooses his electoral chances (in what promises to be a close race).

It's just politics. (It probably helps a little that Labour people have been going round UK media assuring hacks who will listen that, secretly, Blair is a Kerry supporter. But not much: even if Bush thought Blair was a groupie, he'd still be cut loose.)

Whole lot of bleating in the British press - here and here - but I suspect that there are fewer illusions amongst voters as to Blair's true relation to Bush on this side of the pond than Stateside - where the Blair equivalent of Gorbymania seems still to hold sway in some quarters.

  1. He nursed the illusion, for instance, that Stresa was another Locarno: and long pursued a maniacal devotion to the League of Nations that - to the extent it ever lived - was dealt a mortal blow in with the Mukden Incident in 1931 and the consequent occupation of Manchuria by the Japanese.


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